Plenary – Agenda item 9: Recommendations of the CND subsidiary bodies

Chair: GA invited CND to examine how its subsidiary bodies could better contribute to implementation of the UNGASS Outcome Document. To respond to this, we have been working since January. Subsidiary bodies are key to our work. Have before you text on decisions reached last Friday. Before we proceed with the adoption of that decision, invite representative of implementation support section of UNODC to introduce this item.

UNODC: Commission convened four regional meetings in 2016. Express appreciation for host countries of these meetings. In following with past practice, all meetings met in informal working groups to allow frank and open discussion on ongoing challenges. Outcomes were captured and adopted in reports of each meeting. Available for CND in form of recommendations. Themes identified by states included strengthening coordination and cooperation against trafficking, current trends in ATS, NPS, and pharmaceutical preparations, countering illicit money laundering, mainstreaming gender perspectives in drug-related policies and programs, etc. This is available to you in the documentation.

Chair of Meeting of Heads of National Drug Law Enforcement Agencies (HONLEA) in Sri Lanka: Over 150 participants discussed drug situation in the region. Evolving threat of ATS. Comprehensive and balanced efforts. Best practices in preventing and countering drug related money laundering. Spoke about continued threats from ATS and NPS, and stressed need for mechanisms for detection, as well as putting such substances under control. Value of a catch all approach to scheduling. Importance of combating drug trafficking, including new innovations, such as arresting dark net site administrators and tracing the sources of their drug supply serious. Consider implementation of UNGASS Outcome Document.

China: HONLEA mechanisms aimed to strengthen law enforcement collaboration at regional level. Significant efforts to support cooperation to combat drug offences. Support efforts to further strengthen HONLEA and hope it will play a greater role in technical and information exchange. Would like to draw attention to our view that as the law enforcement cooperation platform, HONLEA should continue to focus on law enforcement and any new items should contribute to law enforcement effectiveness. Any change to HONLEA’s mandate should be implemented after consensus is reached.

Thailand: Law enforcement faces significant challenges in responding to changing trends in drug trafficking. Three conventions are basis for international cooperation on drug issues. Dismantling of drug trafficking organizations and need to reduce drug abuse is essential. National legislation formulated under these frameworks. Aware that there is no one size fits all solution. What works in one country may not function in another. Have in place an integrated and mutually reinforcing approach. Committed to working closely with governments and in international cooperation. Ready to share best practices, especially in alternative development, through which we have reduced cultivation. Evolving threats posed by ATS and NPS. Alarming rise in NPS. Encourage sharing of information. Arrest of significant drug kingpin last year. Need to build a network among us to tackle drug syndicate networks.

USA: Appreciate work of CND subsidiary bodies. Congratulate them on producing report that will help us move forward with 2009. Welcome UNGASS Outcome Document. Reports of subsidiary bodies useful in recommendations they contain. Allocation of resources to both supply reduction and demand reduction. Need multidisciplinary and balanced approach. Challenges posed by precursors, synthetics, and NPS, including review of control methods. Great interregional collaboration. Encourage subsidiary bodies to examine how they can best implement the UNGASS Outcome Document.

Chair: Invite meeting to approve draft decision. Secretariat informed me that there are no budgetary implications. Decision is adopted. Thank you.

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